Keith Miller shares his vision of a fallen angel

 

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When literary and detective agent George Zacharias finds a fallen angel on a Cairo street, his first thought is profit. Zacharias and his sidekick, Tomo, hide the angel as they try to figure out who she is and where she came from. However, they soon find themselves pursued by sinister forces.

Terrified, the hapless detectives flee with their catch, first to the city’s seedy underbelly, then into the desert, where they take refuge in a hidden monastery. There is no escape from their pursuer, however, for he is Lucien Yaldabaoth, the prince of darkness. As Zacharias slowly pieces together the angel’s story and uncovers Yaldabaoth’s nefarious purposes, he realizes there is more at stake than he had imagined.

Read the first chapter on Keith’s website.


 

“Written in a terse, noir style, the evocative mix of the mundane and the fabulous has a dreamlike quality.”

Publisher’s Weekly

“Miller is a true sorcerer . . . This novel will hold you under a fantastic spell.”

Christopher Barzak

“A quirky, mysterious, lovely and slightly dark detective novel.”

Amazon Vine

 “A masterful fusion of literary modes and the mark of a great talent. Miller wields his pen like no one else.”

Simon Strantzas


Keith Miller black and white 2

Keith Miller

In 1999, after three years in southern Sudan, my wife and I moved to Egypt. Soon after we arrived, I picked up E. M. Forster’s Alexandria: A History and a Guide, which has been called the best guidebook ever written. It deftly melds the mythology and history of the city with modern-day landmarks. In the opening pages, Forster gives a brief synopsis of the Gnostic cosmogony, discussing the demiurge and Sophia, the last of the fallen angels. Reading his overview, I had a vision of a fallen angel on a Cairo sidewalk, and knew I would write her story one day.

Seven years later, the notion of a literary and detective agent came to me, and dovetailed with the earlier vision of the fallen angel. In the meantime, I’d discovered the Nag Hammadi texts and had delved deeper into Gnosticism, and realized I could fruitfully bring that knowledge to bear on the tale of Sophia and my blundering detective, George Zacharias. The book was started in Beni Suef in Upper Egypt, completed in Madison, Wisconsin, and polished in Ventura, California.

One of the great pleasures I had while working on this book was the discovery of Gustav Davidson’s A Dictionary of Angels: Including the Fallen Angels, an immensely rich and comprehensively researched text. I knew little about angels and their hierarchies when I started out, and Davidson’s book provided the background I needed to create a solid structure. I’ll leave off with the following passage from Davidson’s alluring introduction:

“Without committing myself religiously I could conceive of the possibility of there being, in dimensions and worlds other than our own, powers and intelligences outside our present apprehension, and in this sense angels are not to be ruled out as a part of reality—always remembering that we create what we believe. Indeed, I am prepared to say that if enough of us believe in angels, then angels exist…”


 

Keith Miller

Keith Miller

Keith Miller was born in Tanzania, and has spent most of his life in East and North Africa. He is the author of two other novels, THE BOOK OF FLYING and THE BOOK ON FIRE , as well as a translation of Arthur Rimbaud’s THE ILLUMINATIONS.

He is married to writer Sofia Samatar. They have two children. Visit his website at millerworlds.com.

 

 

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